Unique Additives for Polymer Modification

cv-left-image-thermal-modification
Products Referenced

SMA®
Norsolene®

Thermal Modification

Traditionally, the upper application temperature of semi-crystalline polymers is improved by increasing the modulus at temperature by simple addition of glass fiber or manipulation of the crystalline behavior. Cray Valley has demonstrated that the Heat Distortion Temperature (HDT) of engineering thermoplastics can be improved by addition of Styrene Maleic Anhydride (SMA®) copolymers. Polymers such as PBT and PA6/6 were shown to increase in HDT by as much as 18°C with additive level additions of the reactive copolymer.

Figure 1 demonstrates the relative change in HDT performance in both a neat PBT and PA66 grade in response to 1% by weight addition of SMA®1000. Introducing 1% by weight SMA®1000 induced an improvement of 13°C and 18°C in PBT and PA66, respectively. In either instance, the reactive SMA® was able to alter the molecular architecture to better withstand an applied load at elevated temperatures.

Figure 1
thermal-modification-figure-1

Figure 2 illustrates a change in the molecular architecture of PBT by introducing 1% by weight SMA® 1000, where a single instance of a glass transition is observed. It is hypothesized that the SMA® was able to rearrange the PBT chains such that it incorporated itself into the backbone. 1 demonstrates the relative change in HDT performance in both a neat PBT and PA66 grade in response to 1% by weight addition of SMA®1000. Introducing 1% by weight SMA®1000 induced an improvement of 13°C and 18°C in PBT and PA66, respectively. In either instance, the reactive SMA® was able to alter the molecular architecture to better withstand an applied load at elevated temperatures.

Figure 2
reaction-scheme-2
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